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Marie Canavaggia, Paris, Pierre Horay. Jean Dubuffet. Les Sables de la mer. Marie Canavaggia, Granit , Magie blanche. Bourdieu, Pierre Canavaggia, p. Lorja, Arturo Par exemple, elle entretient une correspondance avec John Cowper Powys et elle lui rend visite. Leyris, p. Theory and Practice. A Historical Reader. Bourdieu et Wacquant, , pp. Julien Green, mai in Louis, , p. Louis, , pp. Henri Godard in Louis, , p. Berman, , p. Il faudra attendre pour que la Belgique retrouve une station de radiodiffusion avec la naissance de Radio Belgique.


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Naissance de la radiodiffusion en France. Lancement des ondes moyennes en France. Marie-Odile Amaury en prendra alors la direction. Le journaliste Jean Antoine se charge de la transmission. Il y a environ TV noir et blanc en France. En vain. He does not mix with their affairs but he is very curious about what this girl is in and why she is more a shadow than a person. The novel has inspiration of a real life issue that happened in France. On October 29, , in the heart of Paris, Mehdi Ben Barka, a leader of the Moroccan leftist in exile, dissapeared and was never seen again.

Decades later, testimonies and information have surfaced, confirming that this possible murder was done with the permission of the French government. This event is taken up in a fictional way from the point of view of a character, a writer, who tries to reconstruct the past and a specific moment of his life. In more than pages, there is always great voids that the reader have to fill while flipping the pages. The reader starts lost in a labyrinth, and has to accumulate the pieces and details of the story. Who is Dannie? Will we know? Who were her friends at the hotel?

Many questions are set to be answered and others are left in the air with not complete solutions. Modiano's writing is so sincere and evocative, and always manages to captivate me; Although sometimes he leaves you with more doubts than answers. But is not life always like that? Half said stories, lost memories that return to haunt you, people who you never see again and moments of your life that lurk you years after they happened. For things like that is that I recommend this work a lot. Este evento es retomado de una forma ficcional desde el punto de vista de un personaje, un escritor, que intenta reconstruir el pasado y un momento concreto de su vida.

I read Modiano not for the plot or characters, not even for Paris. I read him for the unique atmosphere he creates. It is like walking through the patchy morning fog: suddenly it lifts revealing you something unexpected and beautiful for a moment or two His protagonist refuses to live life linearly. I imagine him almost squinting when he is trying to find these patches of vivid brightness in the fog I read Modiano not for the plot or characters, not even for Paris. I imagine him almost squinting when he is trying to find these patches of vivid brightness in the fog of his past and remain there for some time with all his senses, oblivious to "today".

We all feel this way occasionally; Modiano unlocks my own memories by association which I did not even know existed. I certainly tried to find the door to the little place in a different city where I stayed many years ago, where a lot of things happened which mean a lot to me.

And I was very surprised, almost shocked that I did not know anymore which of one of these doors lining up in front of me I used to enter at least twice a day. I thought I would never forget this place. Can I rely then on my memory what happened there? Or it is just a story I am telling myself Ps He also effortlessly articulates certain observations which I relate to wholeheartedly: "The truest encounters take place between two people who intimately know nothing about each other" "I have not recorded its into my black notebook the way we tend not to write down the most intimate details of our lives for fear that, once on the paper, they no longer be ours.

May 27, Stef Smulders rated it did not like it Shelves: humbug. Vague vague vague. The author plays a foul game with the reader by suggesting that he will reveal the connection between past events, while he never does. He does not ask his companions questions when it would be logical, does not include certain information in his 'black book' when it is important, while his excuses not to do this are always artificial, it is an authors trick. Here and there are names of writers and quotes and titles of books mentioned which seem insightful but turn out to lead Vague vague vague.

Here and there are names of writers and quotes and titles of books mentioned which seem insightful but turn out to lead nowhere. He encounters an admired poet, one Jacques, who wrote a poem that, by chance? That poet is called Jacques Audibert and indeed wrote 'Dannie'. Does this bring us closer to understanding this book? All loose threads, false tracks. Also the title The night's lawn seems to have little to do with the content.

Lettres à Anne

Much mourning for oblivion, wandered by empty streets, doubt. The main character Jean? I can not identify with it. Vague characters looking for a real story. Emperor's new clothes! View 1 comment. As with the other Modiano novels I've read, this is a short book so much poetry and atmosphere in its lines, I just have to stop and absorb. He has said he writes the same book over and over again, but what a book it is. Reputedly somewhat autobiographical, but Paris has never been so haunting or so menacing.

Modiano never gives easy answers and leaves puzzles up to the reader to try and dissemble, but it is the beauty of his language and the haunting quality of his imagery that stays with the reader rather than the plot. Another great book by what is turning out to be my favorite living French novelist, Patrick Modiano.

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The Black Notebook looks across the years of its narrator's life, as he remembers his relationship with a strange young woman named Dannie and some of her dodgy friends. He uses his notebook as a key to his feelings at the time, which apparently made a lasting impression on him. Because of his own background and his own highly unorthodox upbringing, Modiano writes convincingly about people who tr Another great book by what is turning out to be my favorite living French novelist, Patrick Modiano.

Because of his own background and his own highly unorthodox upbringing, Modiano writes convincingly about people who try desperately to understand the past as a possible key to their present, which is never quite so brilliant as their past. I read this great Adam Thirlwell quote about Modiano that i think really nails it, he said 'You read each Modiano novel for its place in a giant sequence: a new restatement of a single unsolvable crime'. Personally i love an author that goes over and over the same themes i always think of Paul Auster because i just find it really human and fascinating to be kinda obsessive like that.

So, yeah, reading a Modiano often feels like reading any other Modiano, and this one has all his usual themes, I read this great Adam Thirlwell quote about Modiano that i think really nails it, he said 'You read each Modiano novel for its place in a giant sequence: a new restatement of a single unsolvable crime'. I like Modiano a lot. Mar 02, Isabelle rated it really liked it. It is a Modiano novel, and with that come a few truths: it is painfully nostalgic, superb in its simplicity and haunting like an inescapable memory.

And then, ther is the title: "The Grass of Nights", which struck me as incredibly beautiful once I had read the book. I just like to repeat it to myself in my mind's voice I nearly keeled over when I heard Modiano had received the Nobel, and reading this book confirms my views. This story reads well enough, but doesn't amount to much. The narrator who, of course, is a writer, spends his time traipsing around Paris, reminiscing, or dreaming, about a girl called Dannie whom he once knew and perhaps loved.

Dannie was involved with a set of dangerous men with evocative names like Duwelz. The text is larded with coded references to rather minor cultural figures like I nearly keeled over when I heard Modiano had received the Nobel, and reading this book confirms my views. At the end of the day, Dannie's real identity and responsibilities remain shrouded in mystery. I must say I doff my hat to Modiano for being able to spin so much out of so little, but why, oh why, is such stuff worth a Nobel? Actual rating: 3. Oct 10, Marc rated it liked it Shelves: french-literature. This is another very nice Modiano, with all its familiar ingredients: the very real Parisian setting in this book especially the neighborhoods in and around Montparnasse , the search for a woman the narrator Jean On the meta-level Mod This is another very nice Modiano, with all its familiar ingredients: the very real Parisian setting in this book especially the neighborhoods in and around Montparnasse , the search for a woman the narrator Jean On the meta-level Modiano confronts us again with the paradox of the relativity of time past and present blend into one another , while the past definitely is another country which is virtually unattainable.

Absolutely beautiful read, and one of the last works of Modiano; winning the Nobel Prize clearly is not favorable for the artistic creativity.. A fairly typical Modiano novel. You're catapulted in a story that seems to have neither a real beginning nor an ending. You don't really get to know much about the characters. Modiano specializes in creating his own typical atmosphere: slightly melancholic and nostalgic, with Paris as an important backdrop, almost as a character in its own right. The books deals with the hunt for and memories about a woman the author was once in love with and who was accused of a murder, the details of which als A fairly typical Modiano novel.

The books deals with the hunt for and memories about a woman the author was once in love with and who was accused of a murder, the details of which also remain pretty obscure throughout the book. I wouldn't say this book was really memorable or that I would recommend it. More the same. Profoundly empty. Is the same book Modiano is writing for many years but getting worse. Random guy walks the streets of Paris, trying to follow the footsteps and solve the mystery of a long lost love. Notes from a black notebook are his guide to the past.

A very confused trip down memory lane, and an endless rant of obscure Parisian streets and places. Absolutely no plot. Worst book ever. I would really rate this a 3. This is a story about a writer who in the sixties met a woman who was mysterious and they had a three month affaire before she disappeared. He has turned to a black notebook that he kept at that time which he noted items mostly about the concept of place, what existed before it was torn down and replaced with new buildings and parks. It is a story about memory and how even minor characters return so real at times that it is like I would really rate this a 3.

It is a story about memory and how even minor characters return so real at times that it is like stepping through a time warp. They are strangely present even though they were relatively insignificant persons that passed through your life yet seem to stand so clear in your memory. It is true that no matter how intimate we are with another person we really never know them or much about them, but perhaps it is also because when we love someone we don't want to know things that might be unpleasant and would cause us to remove ourselves from their presence.

The memories of this passion are set in the 60s which were fraught with intrigue surrounding Algeria's push for independence and the war that ensued as France tried desperately to hold onto control of this colony. Dannie, the young woman he loved had ties to many men in her loose circle that were somehow tied to these troubles.

He had been called in and interogated by the police regarding his knowledge of these men and Dannie who was using several aliases.

L'Enfant des neiges, tome 5 : Les Portes du passé

Years later with the use of his notebook he tried to retrace his steps, revisiting the places they walked together trying to figure out what he knew or failed to question. Who has not been tempted to retrace our steps in life and relook at past loves and try to determine what it was that we failed to see that lead to the ending of that relationship? I started Patrick Modiano's new novella during a layover at Charles de Gaulle airport this week and it made me wish so much that I had scheduled an extra day or two to go out and wander the streets, gardens, and cafes of Paris.

Like other works I've read of his this year Paris Noir, Suspended Sentences The Black Notebook explores similar themes of stirring up the past, re-tracing steps and old haunts, and trying to make sense of memories of lost youth. Here, Jean, now a grown man, reflects bac I started Patrick Modiano's new novella during a layover at Charles de Gaulle airport this week and it made me wish so much that I had scheduled an extra day or two to go out and wander the streets, gardens, and cafes of Paris.

Here, Jean, now a grown man, reflects back to the mysteries surrounding a circle of long-disappeared friends and a past love with only the clues from his scattered notes and hazy recollections to guide him. Although I only recently discovered Patrick Modiano, he's quickly become one of my favorite authors.

Louis Aragon

I love the dreamlike quality of his writing and that often he reads like a guidebook to Parisian streets and cafes as seen through dark sunglasses. Characters converse as they navigate half-lit streets, and atmosphere and disquiet pervades every page. You never have to have visited Paris to get a sense of place, and Modiano's version feels like it exists in an alternate reality anyway.

All this makes for an incredibly immersive experience and unlike typical noir, Modiano creates suspense by what is often left out or unsaid, and by pulling from chance encounters, fragments of conversations, and quotidian, everyday occurrences. Rather than crafting complex plots, Memories are their own mysteries and usually unreliable witnesses. If you haven't yet had a chance to check out this amazing Nobel Prize-winning author, The Black Notebook is an excellent entry point, and a great place to dive in to his world and get lost.

Due out in late September A present-day writer, Jean, uses an old notebook to retrace a murky and dangerous period in his life, 50 years ago in Paris. He was involved with a young woman named Dannie -- if that was her name -- who in turn is mixed up with a group of secretive and sinister men. Dannie would draw Jean into their orbit, and Jean in turn would be followed, and questioned by a police inspector, Langlais, both then and on occasion in later years.